DIALOGUE

DIALOGUE.jpg
DIALOGUE.jpg

DIALOGUE

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as a contemporary photographer my role is, ironically enough, to look towards the future. for the past two years my practice in photography has evolved to become a bare-bones but politically charged expression of a city. photography cannot remain fixed as an expression of reality nor a catalyst for ideas. it must become the central topic of discussion in relation to current issues such as global warming, income inequality and global capitalism. i believe that as an artist in contemporary society i must look forward to create awareness and foster a discussion and action around the issues that matter most today.

what i am trying to achieve with this project is to bring to the table one of the most crucial elements of the human intellect: dialogue. in a world where an increasing number of people and communities are becoming distant and divisive to one another, i believe dialogue is the best tool that we human beings possess to overcome the growing issues that we as a society, and as a species, are currently facing.

one of the things that has fostered dialogue for thousands of years are books. books are an awe-inspiring way of putting down ideas on paper and letting them grow in others’ minds. this has been the case for millennia and it’s today more important than ever to come back to books as a format that promotes a deep understanding of a subject and which also provokes anger, empathy and action in readers.

as a photographer and visual artist, my language is images. i have therefore decided to self-publish a book that attempts to reshape spoken dialogue into a visual experience. in the first issue of this book, no words are printed on the page except for the title, to bring the message of the image forward without any distractions. the title will serve as guidance for the reader, to demistify as concisely as possible what the message of the book is. just as a written text can be interpreted, the images on this book will leave room for the reader (in this case the viewer) to feel on their own what those images bring to them, to search inside their psyche emotions stirred by homelessness or death.